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A Camera that Shoots 103 Degrees

By // May 20, 2011 // Posted in Photography

Go Wide and Get Wet: Lomography’s LC-Wide Film Camera Shoots 103 Degrees

The advancing wave of retro-nostalgia is growing bigger, and Lomography appears to be the slick surfer perched atop that wave, with its cool range of film cameras. Their new golden surfboard is the LC-Wide, a 17mm format-changin’ film camera ride.

Taking on where the flagship LC-A+ left off (which itself took off where the original Russian LC-A camera left off some 27 years ago), the LC-Wide has a few novel tricks up its plastic sleeve. As well as being able to take photos with a wider angle than the LC-A+’s 32mm lens shoots, users now have the power to choose between shooting in half-frame (17 x 24mm), square (24 x 24mm) and full-format (36 x 24mm).

That means you can choose the best size for the sweeping vista you’re about to snap, or that doggy close-up—but if you happen to choose the half-frame format, snap away as many times as you’d like, because you’re able to fit 72 photos onto a single roll of 35mm film. Check out some of the sample photos shot with the LC-Wide here, to see what I’m going on about.

Yep, you can still find 35mm film in many stores for literally a couple of dollars/pounds/euros, and get developed at photo labs or chemists around the world for a couple more dollars. I like to get mine printed onto CDs, but if you want to wallpaper your house with all your photos, it really doesn’t cost much extra to get prints as well.

The ISO setting spans 100 to 1600, with the maximum aperture clocking in at 1:4.5; the maximum shutter speed being 1/500, and the focusing range from 0.4m to infinity. Like the LC-A+, the hotshoe lets you attach a flash for nighttime shooting (add the color strips the Diana flash comes with, for more zany fun), and you can flick the switch for multiple exposures too. All of the usual LC-A+ accessories are supported by the LC-Wide, such as the cable release, instant back (which enables you to shoot instant film, Polaroid-style) and tripods. Click here to read more. [Gizmodo]

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Jacqueline Tobin

Jacqueline Tobin

Jacqueline Tobin is the Editor-in-Chief of Rangefinder magazine and the author of Wedding Photography Unveiled: Inspiration and Insight From 20 Top Photographers (Amphoto Books, 2009); and The Luminous Portrait (Amphoto Books, 2012). The second-generation native New Yorker cherishes her Sunday mornings hunkered down with The New York Times, fresh bagels and a great cup of coffee.

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