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Day and Night: Binary Prints Reveal the Nocturnal Lives of DJs

By // August 7, 2013 // Posted in Camera & Lens, Photography, Portrait, Uncategorized

How do you capture an all-encompassing portrait of someone who has two very different personas? Alex Trochut took on the challenge when he decided to create portraits of DJs in his series, “Binary Prints“. The Barcelona/Brooklyn-based illustrator, designer and typographer, who designs for such companies as Nike, Coca-Cola and The New York Times, created and patented a printmaking process that shows two different sides of a DJ’s life: one of a nocturnal person by day and another of a powerful, hypnotizing music god by night.

All photos © Alex Trochut

The portrait of Damian Lazarus is an homage to his energetic electro house music. All photos © Alex Trochut

Trochut “became interested in the duality that could be represented in one two-dimensional work on paper,” as written in his artist’s statement. Revealed a couple months ago at Barcelona’s Sónar Festival, the portraits from “Binary Prints” were essentially printed on a grid using different types of ink. With light, the black ink shows a DJ’s quiet life during the day; in darkness, the glow-in-the-dark ink shines through to reveal the artist’s exhilarating power at night.

James Murphy Binary Print

Trochut chose to use loud pop art for James Murphy‘s portrait, a nod to the musician’s electronic pop style in his group, LCD Soundsystem.

Along with Damian Lazarus, James Murphy and Acid Pauli, Trochut created day-and-night portraits for the percussion-playing DJ Caribou, the post-rock electro artist Four Tet, experimental DJ Lucy, and the world-music inspired Spanish musician John Talabot. Not only does the series show how these artists identify themselves, “Binary Prints” calls into question our true understanding of the people behind electronic music, whose faces are not necessarily the centerpiece of their identity as other artists and entertainers.

Acid Pauli Binary Print

Acid Pauli‘s portrait is a tribute to the psychedelic genre after which he is named.

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Libby Peterson

Libby Peterson

Libby Peterson is the associate editor of Rangefinder. She graduated from Indiana University’s School of Journalism last year and moved to New York, starting off as the magazine's editorial intern. Having had a full-immersion French education growing up in her native Minneapolis, she especially enjoys writing about culture, design, and the arts.

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