How Does The New Manfrotto Drone Backpack Stand Out From The Pack? [Tech Tuesday]

By // December 1, 2015 // Posted in Tech Tuesday

Manfrotto‘s not the first company to manufacture a backpack specifically for quadcopters, but the D1—the first model in its new Aviator collection—is an affordable option, and has at least one cool feature that we think helps it stand out from the pack.

Drone Backpack D1_08One of the features we particularly like about the D1 is its ability to safely stow the intact quadcopter (or, as Manfrotto calls it, the “flying camera”) in the backpack without removing its propellers when you move from one location to another. The main body is protected by the interior of the backpack while the props remain outside the bag. Then, when you’re done for the day, just remove the props and store it inside the pack.

Drone Backpack D1_09Designed to fit a DJI Phantom 1, 2 or 3, controller, and accessories, the pack also accommodates a full-size DSLR, a lens or two and a tripod, which attaches to the outside. Of course, there’s room for a camera and personal accessories, as well as an internal laptop compartment (which fits up to a 17-inch laptop and a tablet) to round out the kit.

MB BP-D1_open_gearConstructed of ripstop nylon, the pack’s drone compartment measures 16.14 x 11.81 x 6.3 inches (H x L x W), with a separate case for the remote. Outer dimensions are 22.05 x 13.39 x 9.06 inches, with padded shoulder and waist straps.

The pack costs $200 and offers plenty of compartments for staying neat and organized so you can start flying once you reach your destination—and even faster when you’re changing locations if you simply attach the ready-for-take-off quadcopter and its props to the pack in between flights.

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Theano Nikitas

Theano Nikitas

Theano Nikitas, a full-time freelance writer and photographer, has been writing about photography for 18 years. Although she loves digital, Theano still has a darkroom and a fridge filled with film thanks to her long-time passion for alternative processes and toy cameras.

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