Was It Worth the Wait? Phottix Odin II Is Finally Here [Tech Tuesday]

By // February 2, 2016 // Posted in Gear & Equipment, Lighting, Products, Tech Tuesday

If you’ve been wondering what happened to the Phottix Odin II since it was originally announced at Photokina in September 2014, the wait is over. The second iteration of Phottix’s flash trigger is now shipping and it is a substantial update to the original model.

PHOTTIX ODIN II IMG_6147-1

Phottix has upped the ante on this one going from three groups to a maximum of five groups and from four channels to 32. In order to keep it backwards compatible, the first four channels have four groups that work with the original Odin receivers. Go to channels five to 32 and you’ll get the updated functions which include a secure, user-set digital ID.

IMG_6162 (19)-1

To make life simple, Phottix has equipped the Odin II with a quick access button for each of the five groups, allowing adjustments to be made via a control dial and locked in. When you switch the group off, information for those lights are not displayed on the trigger’s LED.

For capturing action, the Odin II offers OverDrive Sync (ODS) in addition to the 1/8000 sec. high speed sync carried over from the first version. Phottix has added remote modeling lamp control (with Indra flashes), an AF assist lamp on the transmitter, among other new features. Sorry Canon users, the new model only supports second curtain sync on Nikon and Sony cameras.

The trigger is compatible with Indra 500/360 TTL, Mitros+, Odin, Strato, Strato II and Atlas II (though you will need firmware updates, which will be available soon for the Phottix Indra and Mitros+).

Other features include TTL power control from +/- 3 EV, manual power control from 1/1 to 1/128 power, flash zoom control and a 332 foot range. For additional specifications and details, visit Phottix or check out the video below. The Odin II is shipping now for $160.

 

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Theano Nikitas

Theano Nikitas

Theano Nikitas, a full-time freelance writer and photographer, has been writing about photography for 18 years. Although she loves digital, Theano still has a darkroom and a fridge filled with film thanks to her long-time passion for alternative processes and toy cameras.

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