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I am always looking for something new every time I photograph a wedding. Whether it’s an interesting new portrait location or a new way of photographing light I feel that it’s my job to make something different and unique for each wedding client. At this November 2010 wedding at the Merion in Cinnaminon, New Jersey the bride had requested portraits of she and her groom by the river in East Brunswick’s Bicentennial Park. After completing the portraits in this location we were walking back to our limo to head over to the Merion and I saw the most incredible light under the bridge we were parked by. Most photographers would walk right by a dirty overpass but I wanted to take the chance to make a unique portrait of the bride. I am always so thankful when my clients trust my vision and know that I have a plan when I ask them to walk under a dirty bridge in their wedding gown! I positioned the bride so that her face was directly in the shaft of sunlight and turned her body so that the breeze blew her veil in the precise direction I wanted it to go. My assistant stood just off to the side to unwrap the veil from around the bride when the wind got too intense and to help it flow properly. My only instruction to the bride was to “play with your veil.” While such a request might seem vague and unfocused I find that giving my clients basic instruction leaves it open for interpretation. I completely understand that twirling around under a bridge, in the wind, with your veil wrapped around your head and your eyes closed might not be the most natural-feeling thing in the world so I always strive to make my clients as comfortable as possible and understand that most people don’t feel natural in front of the camera right away. This image ended up being one of my favorite images I made in 2010 and it was because my client trusted me that this photograph was made possible!

Photo © Susan Stripling

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Curious about the photo above? Susan Stripling sheds insight on one of her favorite images:
“I am always looking for something new every time I photograph a wedding. Whether it’s an interesting new portrait location or a new way of photographing light, I feel that it’s my job to make something different and unique for each wedding client.

At this November 2010 wedding in New Jersey, the bride had requested portraits of she and her groom by the river in East Brunswick’s Bicentennial Park. After completing the portraits in this location, we were walking back to our limo when I saw the most incredible light under the bridge we were parked by. Most photographers would walk right by a dirty overpass, but I wanted to take the chance to make a unique portrait of the bride. I am always so thankful when my clients trust my vision and know that I have a plan when I ask them to walk under a dirty bridge in their wedding gown!

I positioned the bride so that her face was directly in the shaft of sunlight and turned her body so that the breeze blew her veil in the precise direction I wanted it to go. My assistant stood just off to the side to unwrap the veil from around the bride when the wind got too intense and to help it flow properly. My only instruction to the bride was to ‘play with your veil.’ While such a request might seem vague and unfocused, I find that giving my clients basic instruction leaves it open for interpretation. I completely understand that twirling around under a bridge, in the wind, with your veil wrapped around your head and your eyes closed might not be the most natural-feeling thing in the world, so I always strive to make my clients as comfortable as possible and understand that most people don’t feel natural in front of the camera right away. This image ended up being one of my favorite images I made in 2010, and it was because my client trusted me that this photograph was made possible!”

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Jacqueline Tobin

Jacqueline Tobin

Jacqueline Tobin is the Editor-in-Chief of Rangefinder magazine and the author of Wedding Photography Unveiled: Inspiration and Insight From 20 Top Photographers (Amphoto Books, 2009); and The Luminous Portrait (Amphoto Books, 2012). The second-generation native New Yorker cherishes her Sunday mornings hunkered down with The New York Times, fresh bagels and a great cup of coffee.

Previously from Jacqueline Tobin:

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